You are a SPECIAL Librarian! You are a Military Librarian!

Categorized | Current Events, Links

2014 Military and Security Development Involving the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

2014 Military and Security Development Involving the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (PDF) Source: U.S. Department of Defense

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) remains one of the United States’ most critical security challenges for many reasons. These include North Korea’s willingness to undertake provocative and destabilizing behavior, including attacks on the Republic of Korea (ROK), its pursuit of nuclear weapons and long-range ballistic missiles, and its willingness to proliferate weapons in contravention of United Nations Security Council Resolutions.

Under Kim Jong Il, DPRK strategy focused on internal security; coercive diplomacy to compel acceptance of its diplomatic, economic, and security interests; development of strategic military capabilities to deter external attack; and challenging the ROK and the U.S.-ROK Alliance. We anticipate these strategic goals will be consistent under North Korea’s current leader, Kim Jong Un.

North Korea fields a large, forward-deployed military that retains the capability to inflict serious damage on the ROK, despite significant resource shortfalls and aging hardware. The DPRK continues to be deterred from conducting large-scale attacks on the ROK primarily due to the strength of the U.S.-ROK Alliance. On a smaller scale, however, the DPRK has demonstrated its willingness to use military provocation to achieve national goals. In 2010, it sank the ROK naval vessel CHEONAN, killing 46 ROK Navy sailors, and shelled Yeonpyeong Island, killing two ROK Marines and two civilians.

North Korea’s continued pursuit of nuclear technology and capabilities and development of intermediate- and long-range ballistic missile programs, as reflected in the December 2012 Taepo Dong-2 missile launch and February 2013 nuclear test, underscore the threat to regional stability and U.S. national security posed by North Korea. These programs, and North Korea’s expressed hostility toward the ROK and proliferation of items prohibited under United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1718, 1874, 2087,and 2094, make the DPRK a continued security challenge for the United States and its Allies and partners.

North Korea’s third nuclear test in February 2013 and subsequent announcement of plans to restart and refurbish nuclear facilities at Yongbyon highlight the continued challenge posed by its nuclear programs. The September 19, 2005 Joint Statement of the Six-Party Talks, and United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1718, 1874, 2087, and 2094 call for the complete and verifiable denuclearization of North Korea. Given North Korea’s unwillingness to abide by these commitments, the U.S. Department of Defense will continue to manage the North Korean security challenge through close coordination and consultation with the international community, particularly with our ROK and Japanese Allies.

The United States remains vigilant in the face of North Korea’s continued provocations and steadfast in its commitments to Allies in the region, including the security provided by extended deterrence commitments through the nuclear umbrella and conventional forces.

Comments are closed.

Translate:

DMIL on Facebook

"Ike and Dutch: Mentor, Protégé, and Common Sense by Dr. Gene Kopelson" presentation at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center

https://youtu.be/9jZSI6bF7d0

Published on Feb 24, 2017

As Ronald Reagan traveled across the United States campaigning for the highest office in the land, the Governor of California possessed an ace in his hand unmatched by his opponents: the ear and advice of former president Dwight D. Eisenhower. Reagan was in constant contact with Ike, following his advice at every turn and going so far as to base his entire 1966 campaign on his mentor’s own successful run years before. Eisenhower’s astute view of internal Washington politics, foreign affairs, military matters, and the swirling pool of primary rivals, provided his protégé the fuel he needed to learn, and eventually win, the war of words. In his latest book, Reagan’s 1968 Dress Rehearsal: Ike, RFK, and Reagan’s Emergence as a World Statesman, Dr. Gene Kopelson outlines the story of Reagan’s first presidential bid with an in-depth look behind the scenes. On Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Dr. Kopelson gave a lecture titled, “Ike and Dutch: Mentor, Protégé, and Common Sense,” to delve deeper into the relationship between Reagan and his mentor and how it not only shaped Reagan’s future campaigns, but his presidency, as well.

In his lecture at the USAHEC, Dr. Kopelson uses never-before-tapped audio clips, interviews with the original 1968 campaign staff, Eisenhower’s personal diary, and material straight from personal correspondence to show how Eisenhower influenced Reagan’s politics and eventually, his far-reaching presidential policies. From Reagan’s hawkish views on Vietnam to his perspective on the Arab-Israeli situation, his groundbreaking steps with Gorbachev and the Soviets to nuclear defense, Eisenhower and Reagan had a close and personal relationship which changed America’s future.

Lecture Date: February 15, 2017

Length: 52 Minutes
... See MoreSee Less

Fri February 24th  ·  

View on Facebook

Military Libraries Division of the Special Libraries Association shared The Library of Congress's video. ... See MoreSee Less

Fri February 24th  ·  

View on Facebook

Military Libraries Division of the Special Libraries Association shared Henry Louis Gates, Jr.'s video. ... See MoreSee Less

Fri February 24th  ·  

View on Facebook

Military Libraries Division of the Special Libraries Association shared U.S. Naval War College Library's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Thu February 23rd  ·  

View on Facebook

Follow Us On:

Categories

Blog Archives