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Internet Tutorials and Information from USAJOBS

Provided by Travis A. Ferrell, MLIS, Chief, Academic Services. Bruce C. Clarke Library. Fort Leonard Wood, MO

I. YouTube Playlists from USAJOBS

A. Applying for Federal Jobs — http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x_ or http://tinyurl.com/l4s4hog

Videos Included in this Playlist

1. Careers at Any Level — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNxo-RRR1aw&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x_ or http://tinyurl.com/mnpmrk7

2. Do I Need to be a United States Citizen to Work for the Federal Government? — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Doo4c0zg68c&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x_&index=2 or http://tinyurl.com/nk9lvoz

3. Are All Federal Internships Under the Pathways Programs? — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-08vizl5eNU&index=4&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x or http://tinyurl.com/oau2h6p

4. What Happens to My Resume When It’s Sent to the Hiring Official? — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_UyAODxbkA&index=4&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x or http://tinyurl.com/oyk8mv8

5. “Special Federal Hiring Authority for Individuals with Disabilities” — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqRwI-6zCow&index=5&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x or http://tinyurl.com/qy3ty3j

6. May I Apply If I’m Close to Completing My Degree — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1SNTuntb4I&index=7&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x or http://tinyurl.com/ppx8fx9

7. Do You Need A Degree for a Federal Job? — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROuGCMUZSpI&index=7&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x or http://tinyurl.com/q497yu5

8. Does Military Rank and Grade Qualify Me for a Specific Federal Pay Grade or Level? — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KukqhxzmpwA&index=8&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x or http://tinyurl.com/owyfqzu

9. 5 Tips for Communicating Your Qualifications — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqYkibnuiJU&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x_&index=9 or http://tinyurl.com/k2ahbmx

10. What are Special Hiring Authorities? — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GF-8YiZEu78&index=10&list=PL8hc9yXSdAa-mqvl1YXxjvvcvWxL2n0x or http://tinyurl.com/kqtpaqa

 

II. Individual YouTube Videos from USAJOBS

B. Finding and Applying for Jobs in the Federal Government — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahg1fselvMg&list=PL4E58D6A9FC4D4315http://tinyurl.com/o6veeoy

C. Resume Writing — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YX7o1PBoFk&index=6&list=PLDCDC3A0FF12307E9 or http://tinyurl.com/q36db9e

D. Pathways for Students and Recent Graduates: Posting Positions on USAJOBS — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mP5D3OXw2NY&list=PLDCDC3A0FF12307E9&index=2 or http://tinyurl.com/ow9ap4a

E. USAJOBS app HD – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CrgI195-rg&list=PLDCDC3A0FF12307E9&index=3 or http://tinyurl.com/o48fcvk

F. USAJOBS App — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-k56lZuFJk&index=5&list=PLDCDC3A0FF12307E9 or http://tinyurl.com/q8akacs

 

III. Resource Center from USAJOBS

G. Resource Center Main Page — https://help.usajobs.gov/index.php/Main_Page or http://tinyurl.com/nkpmquw

H. “What is a saved search and how do I create a saved search?” page — https://help.usajobs.gov/index.php/What_is_a_saved_search_and_how_do_I_create_a_saved_search%3F or http://tinyurl.com/py7e5ux

I. “Welcome Students and Recent Graduates” page — https://my.usajobs.gov/StudentsAndGrads or http://tinyurl.com/ldf3okz

J. “Welcome Veterans” page — https://my.usajobs.gov/Veterans or http://tinyurl.com/mf54frq

 

 

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New Membership Report from OCLC Says Education, Learning and Libraries May Be Reaching a “Tipping Point”

The report was published today by OCLC. (spotted by Amy Tursky)

A video featuring a conversation between OCLC CEO Skip Prichard and Cathy De Rosa, OCLC Vice President for the Americas and Global Vice President of Marketing, was also released today and embedded below.

Title

At a Tipping Point: Education, Learning and Libraries

Briefly

The study aims to provide librarians with important information about the trends and triggers that are reshaping education—and the opportunities and challenges this shift brings to libraries.

The report explores:

  • Habits and perceptions of online learners
  • Expectations for the future of online learning
  • Top-of-mind perceptions of a college education
  • Factors influencing the college choice
  • Library use by online learners—on campus and online
  • MOOCs—a massively interesting case study on the future of education
  • The library brand
  • Implications and opportunities for academic and public libraries

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Data Flood: Helping the Navy Address the Rising Tide of Sensor Information

Data Flood: Helping the Navy Address the Rising Tide of Sensor Information
Source: RAND Corporation

In the U.S. Navy, there is a growing demand for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) data, which help Navy commanders obtain situational awareness and help Navy vessels perform a host of mission-critical tasks. The amount of data generated by ISR sensors has, however, become overwhelming, and Navy analysts are struggling to keep pace with this data flood. Their challenges include extremely slow download times, workstations cluttered with applications, and stovepiped databases and networks — challenges that are only going to intensify as the Navy fields new and additional sensors in the coming years. Indeed, if the Navy does not change the way it collects, processes, exploits, and disseminates information, it will reach an ISR “tipping point” — the point at which its analysts are no longer able to complete a minimum number of exploitation tasks within given time constraints — as soon as 2016.

The authors explore options for solving the Navy’s “big data” challenge, considering changes across four dimensions: people, tools and technology, data and data architectures, and demand and demand management. They recommend that the Navy pursue a cloud solution — a strategy similar to those adopted by Google, the Intelligence Community, and other large organizations grappling with big data’s challenges and opportunities.

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Research Links: Cybersecurity Policy

Research Links: Cybersecurity Policy
Source: Council on Foreign Relations

How can the United States protect cyberspace “control system of our country,” without restricting the open “flow of information on the Internet”? What should countries consider when developing international cybersecurity standards and protocol? What should their citizens know to protect their information and their rights? Cybersecurity Policy Research Links provide news, background information, legislation, analysis, and international efforts to protect government and the public’s information.

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Commemorate the Anniversary of Arlington National Cemetery through Government Documents

Trudy Hawkins posted: “This year marks the 150th anniversary of the designation of Arlington National Cemetery. On May 13, 1864, the body of Private William Henry Christman of Pennsylvania was laid to rest on the grounds of Arlington House, the former home of Gen. Robert E. Lee”

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Commemorate the Anniversary of Arlington National Cemetery through Government Documents

by Trudy Hawkins

150th ANCThis year marks the 150th anniversary of the designation of Arlington National Cemetery. On May 13, 1864, the body of Private William Henry Christman of Pennsylvania was laid to rest on the grounds of Arlington House, the former home of Gen. Robert E. Lee until the Civil War. Private Christman was the first soldier laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery, one month prior to its official establishment as a military cemetery. The first of many events to be held this summer commemorating this important anniversary, began on May 13, 2014 with the laying of a wreath at Private Christman’s grave. Special Guided Tours are also planned, through the months of May and June. The events conclude with a laying of a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on June 16th.

A wreath is placed at the grave of Army Private William Christman, the first person laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery. Image source: www.dcmilitary.com

A wreath is placed at the grave of Army Private William Christman, the first person laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery. Image source: http://www.dcmilitary.com

There are many Government documents available to learn more about the Civil War, Arlington House, and the designation and history of Arlington National Cemetery. For a brief history, check out the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs publication, Arlington National Cemetery. You can also check out this fact sheet about the history and development of all VA National Cemeteries.

Arlington House and the development of Arlington National Cemetery

The National Park Service (NPS) has published several publications regarding the remarkable history of Arlington House, including the following publications, which are currently available from the U.S. Government Bookstore:

arlington houseArlington House: A Guide to Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, Virginia. Although small in size like most NPS handbooks, this publication provides a wealth of information on the history of Arlington House. The publication opens with an introduction of General Lee and Arlington House. It also presents a brief historical account of the house and its occupants, the Custises and the Lees, as well as providing concise information on the house and its grounds.

cultural landscape reportThe National Park Service also published a Cultural Landscape Report about Arlington House in 2001. As stated in the report, “It’s hard to imagine today what the grounds of Arlington House originally looked like because of the graves of Arlington National Cemetery that surround the house. Arlington National Cemetery almost overwhelms Arlington House.” This Cultural Landscape Report and Site History about Arlington House, tells the story of the creation and use of Arlington House and its link to the formation and design of our national cemetery. It compiles in one place the site’s heritage, documents the changes over time, and establishes what is important to preserve. To learn more about Cultural Landscape Reports read A Guide to Cultural Landscape Reports: Contents, Process, and Techniques available from the GPO Bookstore. You can also read Custis-Lee Mansion: The Robert E. Lee Memorial online from the National Park Service, or check out a print copy at a local Federal depository library.custis-lee mansion

National Cemetery Burial Eligibility

Arlington National Cemetery holds about 27 funerals each week. There are several House Committee Reports regarding veterans’ eligibility for burial in Arlington. H.R. 3211 of the 105th Congress, as well as H.R. 3423 from the 107th Congress amended Title 38 of the U.S. Code to modify eligibility of burial in Arlington National Cemetery. You can access hearings, as well as the legislative history for H.R. 3423 and other bills online. You can also visit a Federal depository library for older reports concerning burials, such as a 1921 report before a subcommittee on the Expenses of burial in Arlington Cemetery of an unknown member of the Expeditionary Forces. You can also browse the volumes of “The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies” for any records of the history of Arlington House and the appropriation of the land by the Federal government after the war. The volumes are available at many Federal depository libraries.

Arlington National Cemetery Memorials

There are many memorials at Arlington National Cemetery commemorating wars, notable military figures, presidents, and service men and women. If you visit a Federal depository library you could check out a copy of “In Remembrance of a Sailor: a shrine to America’s heroes”, a 1990 publication from the U.S. Navy Department. Information about other memorials in the cemetery can be found on the Arlington Cemetery website.

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

President Dwight D. Eisenhower places a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of World War I during interment ceremonies for the Unknown Servicemen of World War II and the Korean Conflict, at Arlington National Cemetery. Image source: Old Guard

President Dwight D. Eisenhower places a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of World War I during interment ceremonies for the Unknown Servicemen of World War II and the Korean Conflict, at Arlington National Cemetery. Image source: Old Guard

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was approved by Congress on March 4, 1921. Details of the act can be found in the Congressional Record from that period. You can visit a Federal depository library to access historic copies of the Congressional Record and view the enabling legislation for the Tomb of the Unknowns. The remains of soldiers from World War I, World War II, and the Korean War lay in state and are honored by The Old Guard. In 1984, the remains of an unknown Vietnam War soldier were interred in the Tomb of the Unknown. A document about this soldier, “The Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam War Era” was created by the U.S. Army Center of Military History. You can read more about it at a Federal depository library, or online from the HathiTrust. Pictures of the Tomb of the Unknowns can be found on the Old Guard Pinterest Board.

If you’re not in the Washington, DC area to participate in any of the events mentioned in this blog, curl up with these documents and immerse yourself in the history and stories of the men and women who fought for our country and were laid to rest on the grounds of the National Cemetery.

How can I get these publications about the history of Arlington House and Arlington National Cemetery?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy this eBook or any other eBook, as well as print publications (with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide) from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore website at http://bookstore.gpo.gov:

Click here to purchase Arlington House: A Guide to Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, Virginia

Click here to purchase A Guide to Cultural Landscape Reports: Contents, Process, and Techniques

Click here to browse our entire Building, Landmarks, and Historic Sites collection.

Order by Phone: You may also Order print editions by calling our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Visit a Federal Depository Library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in the Catalog of U.S. Government Publications or CGP.

About the author: Cathy Wagner is an outreach librarian with the Education & Outreach team in the Library Services & Content Management (LSCM) division at the Government Printing Office.

Additional content, images and editing provided by Trudy Hawkins, a writer and marketing specialist in GPO’s Publication & Information Sales Division supporting the U.S. Government Online Bookstore (http://bookstore.gpo.gov).

 

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