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September is Suicide Prevention Month


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Power of 1

One click, one call, one text — one life. 

One small act can make a difference in the life of a Veteran or Service member in crisis.

Every year, organizations across the country recognize September as Suicide Prevention Month. This year, the Veterans Crisis Line is asking you to think about the power of one and consider the many ways a single act can give Veterans access to confidential support and resources.

For Veterans going through a difficult time and their loved ones who are concerned about them, a single call, chat, or text can be a critical first step. One conversation with a Veteran about how he or she is doing can open the door to services and support.

Everyone can be the person who makes a difference in a Veteran’s life, and connecting with support doesn’t have to be hard. The Veterans Crisis Line can help.

Free, Confidential Resources

The Veterans Crisis Line is a free, confidential resource that Veterans and their families and friends can access any day, anytime. Trained professionals — some of them Veterans themselves — are ready to listen, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Since launching in 2007, the Veterans Crisis Line has answered more than 1.25 million calls and made more than 39,000 lifesaving rescues.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) counts on grass-roots networks and community organizations to spread the word that support is just a call, click, or text away — because one small act can make the difference.

Identifying Signs of Crisis

VA urges groups and individuals nationwide to stay alert for signs of suicide risk. The first step in preventing suicide is understanding the warning signs; people may show signs of risk before considering harming themselves. Warning signs include:

  • Hopelessness, feeling like there’s no way out
  • Anxiety, agitation, sleeplessness, or mood swings
  • Feeling like there’s no reason to live
  • Rage or anger
  • Engaging in risky activities without thinking
  • Increasing alcohol or drug abuse
  • Withdrawing from family and friends

The presence of the following signs requires immediate attention:

 

  • Thinking about hurting or killing yourself
  • Looking for ways to kill yourself
  • Talking about death, dying or suicide
  • Self-destructive behavior such as drug abuse, weapons, etc.

If you notice these warning signs, tell a Veteran about the Veterans Crisis Line, or make the call yourself. Call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat, or text to 838255 for free, confidential support, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

 

Spread the Word

This Suicide Prevention Month, show how the power of one single act can save a life.

 

Visit VeteransCrisisLine.net/ThePowerof1 to download free Suicide Prevention Month materials, including flyers to print and distribute, digital ads to display on your website, and content to post on social networks or publish in newsletters. Learn how you and your community can work together to prevent suicide.

 

No one can do everything, but everyone can do something. We are all part of the solution, and it starts with one small act.

 

Visit VeteransCrisisLine.net to learn more.

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September: National Preparedness Month

National Preparedness Month (NPM) starts are on September 1st! This year’s theme is “Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare.” Take action by participating in America’s PrepareAthon! on or around September 30. Each week also has a preparedness them. Check them out.
• Week 1 – How to… Reconnect with Family After a Disaster.
• Week 2 – Know How To plan for specific needs before a Disaster.
• Week 3 – How to… Build an Emergency Kit.
• Week 4 & 5 – How to… Practice for an emergency.
For more details about National Preparedness Month visit: www.ready.gov/september #NatlPrep

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On 7 August 1782, George Washington created the Purple Heart

Washing awarding first Purple Hearts

The Purple Heart is the badge for meritorious action. It is our oldest military award.

Learn more about the creation of the award and what it honors. (PDF)

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Government Book Talk: Not Just Space: Celebrating NASA’s Anniversary by Exploring the Aeronautics Program

Not Just Space: Celebrating NASA’s Anniversary by Exploring the Aeronautics Program

by Trudy Hawkins

NASAbook NASAlogoThis month marks NASA’s 56th anniversary. In those 56 years, NASA has made amazing contributions to modern American life. Yet, people often forget that many of NASA’s most meaningful contributions have nothing to do with space exploration. The fascinating book, NASA’s First A: Aeronautics from 1958 to 2008 by Robert G. Ferguson shines a light on NASA’s aeronautics program, an important but often underappreciated part of the agency.

The book explains that while the aeronautics program is often overshadowed by the more glamorous space program, aeronautics research has had a direct and undeniable impact on both commercial and military technology. The book illustrates the importance of the aeronautics program by offering up a chronological history of the aeronautics program including the major research areas and important technological contributions of the program.

The chronological history of the aeronautics program begins in the book’s second chapter, which covers NACA (the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics), the predecessor of NASA. Chapter three focuses on the creation of NASA and how aeronautics fit into the new agency as well as the contributions the program made to the “space race.” Chapter four covers the 1970s, a time when NASA faced pressures to contribute solutions to increasing energy and environmental problems and aeronautics research shifted to help tackle some of these issues. The fifth chapter discusses the 1980s when the Cold War created a strong focus on aeronautical R&D. The chapter also covers more quotidian, but equally important, contributions of the aeronautics program, like troubleshooting for wind shear and icing. Chapter six is about the 1990s, and focuses on aeronautics after the Cold War as well as the creation and eventual demise of two major aeronautics programs, the High Speed Research Program and the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program. The seventh chapter is the end of the book’s chronological history and it covers the three major research areas of the early 2000s: blended wing body design research, intergraded scramjet research, and air traffic control research.

The book is a great read. It offers an interesting introductory history of NASA’s aeronautics program, and readers will certainly no longer make the mistake of thinking that NASA is only concerned with space.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS PUBLICATION?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy this as well as the following new publications from NASA (with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide) from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore website at http://bookstore.gpo.gov:

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal Depository Library: Search for these in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in the Catalog of U.S. Government Publications or CGP.

About the author: Our guest blogger is Megan Martinsen, Graduate Intern in GPO’s Library Services & Content Management Division

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Thousands of WWII War Crimes Records Unveiled – Holocaust Museum makes digital archive available to public

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington has obtained a full copy of the UN War Crimes Commission archive that has largely been locked away for the past 70 years and has made the entire digital archive freely available to visitors in its research room. The vast collection includes about 500,000 digitized microfilm images with more than 10,000 case files.

http://bit.ly/1tgkYbp

 

Source: http://www.newser.com/story/191083/thousands-of-wwii-war-crimes-records-unveiled.html

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