You are a SPECIAL Librarian! You are a Military Librarian!

Drum Battle: III Marine Expeditionary Force (III MEF) Band vs. Republic of Korea (ROK) Army Band.

 

Published on Oct 9, 2014

Share this video if you please! No legal or licensing needed. Just share for the enjoyment of others. A friendly drum line competition between the III Marine Expeditionary Force (III MEF) Band and the Republic of Korea (ROK) Army Band. Anyone who wishes to share the video may do so.

 

 

 

 

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Family and Medical Leave Benefits Provided by the Military

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present a new report, Family and Medical Leave Benefits Provided by the Military.

Military personnel receive family and medical leave benefits as part of their service in Denmark, Israel, Norway, and Sweden. All countries provide leave following the birth or adoption or a child and caring for a sick child. Leave may be paid or unpaid. Israel distinguishes between permanent-service personnel and conscripts when awarding leave benefits.

Visit http://www.loc.gov/law/help/military-leave-benefits/index.php to read the entire report.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress available at http://www.loc.gov/law/help/current-topics.php.

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2014 Federal Library Bibliographic Analysis and Report

The Library of Congress has just completed the 2014 Federal Bibliographic Record Analysis!

 

The final report, which describes the methodology and presents the results of the analysis, is now available at: http://www.loc.gov/ead/flbra/.  You may find it quite innovative and informative.  The  Federal Bibliographic Record Analysis project was initiated in 2012 when 11 libraries agreed to participate in a pilot to analyze their bibliographic records to identify overlap among the institutions.  This year the initiative has been expanded to include 30 partners.

Once you open the link, you’ll see a document, “filelist.docx”, that lists the files available.  Each file is a summary of a particular library’s bibliographic analysis.  The overall report, which also contains the research methodology, is called “flbraReport_2014.pdf” and is the last file name on the list.  It may be helpful to read this file before examining others.

The Library of Congress is interested in adding more libraries to this federal bibliographic analysis for the upcoming cycle.  If you are interested in participating, please contact either Stephen Short (sshort@loc.gov) or John Barton (jbar@loc.gov).  There is no cost to participate in this project.

Library staff are also available to provide presentations on this topic if requested.

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Government BookTalk: Happy Birthday, U.S. Navy!

Happy Birthday, U.S. Navy!

US Navy logoOctober 13 marks the 239th anniversary of the establishment of the United States Navy. Dating back to the early days of the revolution, the Navy was initially formed when the Continental Congress voted to “fit out” two sailing vessels. The sailing vessels armed with carriage and swivel guns and manned by small crews were sent out in an effort to stop transports that helped supply British forces during the American Revolution. This effort mandated by the Continental Congress on October 13, 1775 established the Continental Navy, and thus is now recognized as the official birthday of the U.S. Navy. Celebrate the remarkable history of the U.S. Navy with these publications currently available from the U.S. Government Bookstore:

008-046-00289-4Naval Documents of the American Revolution, V. 12, American Theater, April 1, 1778-May 31, 1778; European Theater, April 1, 1778-May 31, 1778: This twelfth volume in the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Naval Documents of the American Revolution series tells the story of the Revolutionary War on the water during the period of April to June 1778. In the tradition of the preceding volumes—the first of which was published in 1964—this work synthesizes edited documents, including correspondence, ship logs, muster rolls, orders, and newspaper accounts, that provide a comprehensive understanding of the war at sea in the spring of 1778. The editors organize this wide array of texts chronologically by theater and incorporate French, Italian, and Spanish transcriptions with English translations throughout. Volume 12 presents the essential primary sources on a crucial time in the young republic’s naval history—as the British consolidate their strength in the Mid-Atlantic, and the Americans threaten British shipping in European waters and gain a powerful ally as France prepares to enter the war.

008-046-00202-9Sea Raiders of the American Revolution: The Continental Navy in European Waters: This book discusses three American Revolutionary War captains: Lambert Wickes, Gustavus Conyngham, and John Paul Jones. Each of them lead raids on British waters during the American Revolution.

008-046-00282-7Commerce Raiding: Historical Case Studies, 1755-2009: The book of sixteen case studies examining commerce raiding or guerre de course shows that this strategy has time after time proven itself a most efficient way for sea powers to exert pressure on an opponent, especially a lesser sea power or land power, but that land powers have had little success using this strategy against sea powers. Topics include international piracy, international trade and historical background for the American War of Independence, the Civil War, and both World Wars.

008-046-00263-1Talking About Naval History: A Collection of Essays: This collection of naval history essays provides a wide historical perspective that ranges across nearly four centuries of maritime history. A number of these pieces have been published previously but have appeared in other languages and in other countries, where they may not have come to the attention of an American naval reading audience. This collection is divided into parts that deal with four major themes: the broad field of maritime history; general naval history, with specific focus on the classical age of sail, from the mid-seventeenth century to the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815; the wide scope of American naval history from 1775 to the end of the twentieth century; and finally, the realm of naval theory and its relationship to naval historical studies.

008-046-00271-1New Interpretations in Naval History: Selected Papers From the Sixteenth Naval History Symposium: A selection of the best 12 papers presented at the 2009 Naval History Symposium, the 16th in the series. The contributors are all maritime and naval historians, and their contributions range from the U.S. colonial era through the 1960s. They are not tied to a central theme but represent the vitality of studies in naval and maritime history.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE PUBLICATIONS?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy these and other publications (with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide) from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore website athttp://bookstore.gpo.gov:

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal Depository Library: Search for these in a nearby Federal depository library.

About the author: Trudy Hawkinsis Senior Marketing and Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication & Information Sales Division supporting the U.S. Government Online Bookstore (http://bookstore.gpo.gov).

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NIH (National Library of Medicine) — Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources

Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources
Source: Disaster Information Management Research Center (National Library Medicine)
Includes:

  • U.S. Federal Organizations
  • U.S. Organizations
  • International Organizations
  • National Government (non-U.S.) Web Sites
  • Free Resources from Publishers for Medical Responders
  • Biomedical Journal Literature and Reports
  • Ebolavirus Information Sources
  • Situation Reports
  • Training
  • Social Media
  • Maps
  • Health Resources for the Public
  • Multi-Language Resources

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Send Your Name on NASA’s Journey to Mars, Starting with Orion’s First Flight

If only your name could collect frequent flyer miles. NASA is inviting the public to send their names on a microchip to destinations beyond low-Earth orbit, including Mars.

Your name will begin its journey on a dime-sized microchip when the agency’s Orion spacecraft launches Dec. 4 on its first flight, designated Exploration Flight Test-1. After a 4.5 hour, two-orbit mission around Earth to test Orion’s systems, the spacecraft will travel back through the atmosphere at speeds approaching 20,000 mph and temperatures near 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean.

But the journey for your name doesn’t end there. After returning to Earth, the names will fly on future NASA exploration flights and missions to Mars. With each flight, selected individuals will accrue more miles as members of a global space-faring society.

“NASA is pushing the boundaries of exploration and working hard to send people to Mars in the future,” said Mark Geyer, Orion Program manager. “When we set foot on the Red Planet, we’ll be exploring for all of humanity. Flying these names will enable people to be part of our journey.”

The deadline for receiving a personal “boarding pass” on Orion’s test flight closes Friday Oct. 31. The public will have an opportunity to keep submitting names beyond Oct. 31 to be included on future test flights and future NASA missions to Mars.

To submit your name to fly on Orion’s flight test, visit:

http://go.usa.gov/vcpz

Join the conversation on social media using the hashtag #JourneyToMars.

For information about Orion and its first flight, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion

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