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USGS Release: Navigate America’s Major Rivers Without Getting Wet

Have you ever dropped a stick into a river and wondered where it might go if it floated all the way downstream? Now you can trace its journey using Streamer – a new on-line service from the National Atlas of the United States®.

Streamer is an online map service that lets anyone trace downstream along America’s major rivers and streams simply by picking a point on a stream.  Streamer will map the route the stream follows.

You can also trace upstream using Streamer. Imagine that you’re standing along the Mississippi River in New Orleans. You’re wondering not only where the river began but also which other streams drained into the Mississippi River before it made its way to your location.  With Streamer you can also:

  • locate your area of interest by specifying stream or place names; by entering latitude and longitude coordinates,
  • enter the identification number for a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gaging station,
  • find out the names of streams and waterbodies by clicking on them,
  • print maps of your downstream and upstream traces,
  • create concise or detailed reports for your upstream and downstream traces,
  • learn about current or historic streamflow at thousands of locations along America’s streams, and
  • find out about the places your stream trace passes through with just a few mouse clicks.

Streamer is fueled by digital hydrographic data for America at one million-scale (an inch is approximately 15.8 miles on the land surface).  These streams and water bodies are generalized from the highly detailed National Hydrography Dataset from The National Map

Streamer lets you navigate rivers in the United States the way other interactive maps help you drive your vehicle from one place to another.  Unlike our nation’s road network, which provides many choices for traveling between two locations, America’s surface waters are somewhat like a network of one-way streets.  You can certainly navigate upstream, but all water flows one way:  downhill.  Use Streamer to trace downstream along that downhill path or use Streamer to trace upstream to highlight rivers at higher elevations that flow to your starting point.

You could stand by the Mississippi River and wonder, “Where did this water come from? Where is it flowing?”  Or with Streamer you can launch your sense of wonder and discovery up and down any of America’s major rivers with a Web connection from your favorite computer or tablet.

For more information: http://nationalatlas.gov/streamer/

The National Atlas of the United States of America® is a cooperative effort to make geographic information collected by the United States government easier to find, get, and use. Its development is led by the National Geospatial Program of the USGS.  “The National Atlas of the United States of America®” and “National Atlas of the United States®” are registered trademarks of the United States Department of the Interior.

Follow the National Atlas on Twitter @nationalatlas

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"Ike and Dutch: Mentor, Protégé, and Common Sense by Dr. Gene Kopelson" presentation at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center

https://youtu.be/9jZSI6bF7d0

Published on Feb 24, 2017

As Ronald Reagan traveled across the United States campaigning for the highest office in the land, the Governor of California possessed an ace in his hand unmatched by his opponents: the ear and advice of former president Dwight D. Eisenhower. Reagan was in constant contact with Ike, following his advice at every turn and going so far as to base his entire 1966 campaign on his mentor’s own successful run years before. Eisenhower’s astute view of internal Washington politics, foreign affairs, military matters, and the swirling pool of primary rivals, provided his protégé the fuel he needed to learn, and eventually win, the war of words. In his latest book, Reagan’s 1968 Dress Rehearsal: Ike, RFK, and Reagan’s Emergence as a World Statesman, Dr. Gene Kopelson outlines the story of Reagan’s first presidential bid with an in-depth look behind the scenes. On Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Dr. Kopelson gave a lecture titled, “Ike and Dutch: Mentor, Protégé, and Common Sense,” to delve deeper into the relationship between Reagan and his mentor and how it not only shaped Reagan’s future campaigns, but his presidency, as well.

In his lecture at the USAHEC, Dr. Kopelson uses never-before-tapped audio clips, interviews with the original 1968 campaign staff, Eisenhower’s personal diary, and material straight from personal correspondence to show how Eisenhower influenced Reagan’s politics and eventually, his far-reaching presidential policies. From Reagan’s hawkish views on Vietnam to his perspective on the Arab-Israeli situation, his groundbreaking steps with Gorbachev and the Soviets to nuclear defense, Eisenhower and Reagan had a close and personal relationship which changed America’s future.

Lecture Date: February 15, 2017

Length: 52 Minutes
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